A walk in Preston – to the Tram Road Bridge 21st May 2024

 

A Wednesday walk arriving in Avenham Park, Preston to visit the Pavilion, shown in the first photo.  In there are some wallboards explaining the design and work for the new bridge design for the Tram Road Bridge which has flakey concrete.  Work is due to start in May.

 

Passing the Japanese Garden that is on the right going down into the valley of the River Ribble.

Teh Japanese Garden in Avenham Park Preston

 

Exhibition of the new Tram Bridge design.  On display in the Avenham Park Pavilion.


Star of the show: the Tram Road Bridge. Soon to be demolished.

The sign at the Tram Road bridge showing the cycle routes.  There are ways to get across as there is a cycle track up onto the East Lancs Bridge.

The East Lancashire railway bridge which you can climb up at each end and walk across it and there is a cycle track up onto the bridge.  Once there you walk or cycle along the track bed towards Lostock Hall or The Capital Centre Shopping Centre at Walton Le Dale. To the latter you can cycle along the river bank on either side.  The bridge behind being the West Coast Main Line.

The now enclosed shelter.  The Belvedere.

The promenade into Avenham Park:

Ribblesdale Place between two of the entrances to Avenham Park.

After some wandering in shops we passed the Old Black Bull on Friargate, next to the Ring Road.

Carrying on towards the centre on Friargate we come to the Town Hall, Cenotaph and Harris Library, Museum and Art Gallery.

Next stop Waterstones, here are the Preston books.

 

Here are local transport related books.   I made a spontaneous purchase afte my wife showed me the book ‘Quizmaster’ about a Burnley pub landlord who achieved some fame creating a pub quiz on line meaing it to be for locals but attracting worldwide teams.   Just issued in Hardback.

 

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The Ribble Steam Railway – Saturday 24th March 2024

A short visit to the Ribble Steam Railway on Saturday 24th March 2024.   Furness Railway No. 20 being the star of the show.   Refurbishment of this was completed at the Furness Railway in their workshop at Preston.   Before that work was done at BAE Systems at Barrow.

Photos of the train at the Ribble Steam Railway depot and crossing the swing bridge at the Preston Dock.   Also photos inside the RSR Museum.

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A walk in Preston – Avenham way – April 2024

The 23rd April 2024, a nice day for a walk round Preston.   This route goes along East Cliff, to Miller and Avenham Parks then along the River Ribble to the Tram Road Bridge.  Then back up above the flood plain into Frenchwood before heading up towards the Preston Minster to Fishergate.

 

Heading down Fishergate from the station we come to East Cliff.  An interesting road that has a very steep fall into the river valley behind the houses on the right hand side.   It also contains some very large houses, probably once owned by wealthy people but now mainly businesses or divided into flats.

First we see the headquarters of the English Football League:The HQ of the English Football League, (EFL), East Cliff, Preston 23rd April 2024

Further along on the left we have a large fairly elegant 3 storey terrace:
East Cliff, Preston, 23rd April 2024

On the right one of the large buildingsEast Cliff, Preston, 23rd April 2024The left side:
East Cliff, Preston, 23rd April 2024
East Cliff, Preston, 23rd April 2024On the right:
East Cliff, Preston, 23rd April 2024

On the right behind the houses it overlooks the sports ground.  Once English Electric Sports Ground
Preston English Electric Sports Ground 23rd April 2024

A walk under the West Coast Main Line in Miller ParkUnderpass from East Cliff into Miller Park, Preston 23rd April 2024

Along the River Ribble.West Coast Main Line crossing the River Ribble Preston, 23rd April 2024

Miller Park, Preston
MIller Park, Preston 23rd April 2024
Avenham Park, riverside walkAvenham Park, Preston, 23rd April 2024

The Tram Road Bridge.  This is now closed being structurally unsafe.  A new bridge has been approved and work is due to start in May 2024.   I might be wrong but the new design looks more obtrusive to the view.   But it only has 2 supports in the river which allows fallen trees to pass in floods without damage to the more delicate structure.

Preston Tram Road Bridge April 2024

The Frenchwood bus depot of Stagecoach.   Which older Prestonians would recall was Rbble Buses HQ and depot.  The HQ being a more interesting Art Deco style building just off this walk.

Stagecoach Bus Depot, Frenchwood, Preston, 23rd April 2024

Cardinal Newman College.  The Catholic College of Preston.
Cardinal Newman's College Preston 23rd April 2024

Cardinal Newman's College Preston 23rd April 2024

 

The high rises in Avenham look a lot smarter now.

Hight rise flats, Avenham, Preston 23rd April 2024

Arkwright House in Preston.  An interesting house where inventor Arkwright started his spinning frame that created a lot of wealth.  Although he had to flee to Cromford due to worker protests in Lancashire.

Arkwiright House, Preston

Preston Minster south side.

St John's Church or Preston Minster 23rd April 2024

The favourite mural.  One of many in Preston, mainly very good.

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Preston mural 23rd April 2024

The Miller Arcade and behind it the Harris Museum, Art Gallery and Library now under renovation until 2025.

 

Miller Arcade and the Harris Preston April 2024

Miller Arcade.  A nice shopping centre although mainly eateries now.

Miller Arcade, Fishergate Preston April 2024

Fishergate, Preston’s main shopping street.

Fishergate Preston April 2024

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A Walk in Preston 19th January 2024 Friargate area

A January walk from Ringway to Adelphi along Friargate to look at the almost complete update of the road.  Past Roper Hall where I sat some Open University exams 50yrs ago.

Then right on Walker Street.  Right again on Patten Street to see how what was Trinity School, which was used as a Building for the Harris College when I was there but is now gone and replaced by Student rooms.

Across the Car Park towards the Playhouse Theatre and back to the Harris Museum, Flag Market, and Waterstones.

The view of Friargate from Ringway. The update not quite complete but looking good.

The view of Friargate from Ringway. The update not quite complete but looking good.

Off Friargate are a number of old alleyways and sett cobbled streets.  Walker’s Court sounds interesting,there is a Walker Street further down. Green door what’s that secret you’re keeping?

A car park and a shrine, to mark the site of the Church of St Mary, sits up this passageway.

 

The Humane Building, Friargate.  Marking the Humane Assurance Company.
This looks a bit flash.  Student lodgings off Friargate.

 

The view down Friargate towards the blue Adelphi pub and UClan.

The latest addition to UCLan.The latest addition to UCLan at Adelphi. The old Adelphi pub.

The latest addition to UCLan and the Adelphi pub.

The Playhouse Theatre, Preston, just back from Friargate and Ringway.

The Harris Museum, Art Gallery and Library across the Flag Market.

The Preston book section in Waterstones, Fishergate, Preston

The view from the Blackpool train over Preston Docklands. A new Porsche dealership in the foreground. It’s flat out-west.

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A walk in Preston 21st October 2023

A walk in Preston on the 21st October 2023.  The photos needs the date changing.

From Miller Park, onto the parade off Bushell Place (Preston is my Paris), Ribblesdale Place,  a Mural, Miller Arcade, The Harris building, The Cenotaph,  The Market, Orchard Street.

To be updated in the correct order.

A walk in Preston Lancashire October 2023.  www.madeinpreston.co.uk

A walk in Preston Lancashire October 2023

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Avenham Park in June 2023

A short summer walk in Avenham Park, Preston.

Avenham Park, Preston.  The riverside walk.

Avenham Park riverside walk, Preston, 19th June 2023

Avenham Park from the main entrance, Preston, 19th June 2023

Avenham Park from the main entrance. Preston, 19th June 2023

Tram Road Bridge and the trees along Tram Road, Preston 19th June 2023

Tram Road Bridge and the trees along Tram Road, Preston 19th June 2023

Avenham Park Pavilion and Preston sign,  19th June 2023

Avenham Park Pavilion and Preston sign, 19th June 2023

 

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Preston to Leyland and back by bus and train 11th May 2023

Another  walk from near Preston Docks to the Bus Station for  a bus to Leyland taking  about 45 minutes.   A walk to the  British Commercial Vehicle Museum taking about 5 minutes.  A quick trip round followed by a 10 minute walk to the railway station.  Train back taking about 5 minutes.  Next a walking return to the docks.

Preston Bus Station

The British Commercial Vehicle Museum at Leyland.  A quick visit, see our other posts for more. 

At Leyland Station a zoom view of the magnificent St Walburge’s Spire about 5 miles away just past Preston Station.

 

An Avanti Pendolino surges through Leyland.  There’s a yellow danger line but you’d be a prat to stand near it.

Arriving at Preston a freight waits while a Barrow to Manchester Airport train leaves platform 6.

This is where the Ormskirk and Colne trains hide.  Platform 3c.   There is a platform 4c to its right.    In case you want to know Platform 3a is the north end of Platform 3, while platform 3b is the south end.  Platform 4 has a similar split.

A Trans-Pennine Express train bound for Oxenholme Lake District.   Liverpool Eurovision 2023 markings.

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A Walk in Preston 27th April 2023

Another walk, this time from a garage at the far end of Preston Docks into the City Centre, about 3 miles each way, more than you’d think.   Walking along Chain Caul Way, turning right into Lockside Road to the outer lock gates.

Here’s the view from the lock gates down the river with the tide quite low.  It was a bright early morning about 8.30am.The view along the River Ribble from the Port of Preston Basin LocksThe view along the River Ribble from the Port of Preston Basin Locks

Looking the other way is a view into the docks as a ships crew might have seen it coming in from the river.   The basin looks a lot smaller than memories and looks like it needs dredging.  Oil ships used to moor here, now the oil comes in by train and it was a bit disappointing to see its load being moved in the opposite direction near the Park and Ride on Strand Road.The view into the Port of Preston from the outer Basin LocksThe view into the Port of Preston from the outer Basin Locks

Crossing the lock gates takes you to the Bullnose which protrudes from the dock area creating a junction to the river.  At hight tide canal barges turn off to the right at Savick Brook after crossing from the River Douglas, this is part of the passage from the Leeds Liverpool Canal to the Lancaster Canal.The view along the River Ribble from the Bullnose at the far western end of Preston DocksThe view along the River Ribble from the Bullnose at the far western end of Preston Docks

On the river side of the Bullnose is a view into Preston. There used to be ship breakers along there.  The river once went through the north of the dock but was diverted when they built it.  It has a lot of meanders as it gets into the flatter areas west of Preston and is tidal on a big tide another 4 miles upstream.The view along the River Ribble into Preston from the near the Bullnose at the far western end of Preston DocksThe view along the River Ribble into Preston from the near the Bullnose at the far western end of Preston Docks

Inside the main dock, which is one of the biggest single dock areas in Britain.  A view towards Preston and the 2nd highest steeple in England, St Walburge’s. To the right is the spire of St Peter’s at the University.   To the left is the tower of St Marks, now apartments, and on the edge of the river valley.The view inside the main dock at the Port of PrestonThe view inside the main dock at the Port of Preston

Passing the car dealers on Port Way and past the Park and Ride on Strand Road.  Crossing Strand Road and up Hartington Road, left at Christ Church Road up to Bow Lane turning right to Fishergate Hill.   Here’s a photo of Walton’s Parade near the station, quite an attractive terrace.Walton's Parade off Fishergate Hill, PrestonWalton’s Parade off Fishergate Hill, Preston

Passing the station and straight on, here is Mount Street former Hospital and Orphanage.  The attractive tower will be retained in a new housing development. The remains of Mount Street Hospital, PrestonThe remains of Mount Street Hospital, Preston

The Harris is more covered in plastic at every visit, this must be the limit.   Due to re-open in 2024 with an expensive refit.The Harris Museum, Art Gallery and Library, Preston, now completely wrapped in plastic during refurbishmentThe Harris Museum, Art Gallery and Library, Preston, now completely wrapped in plastic during refurbishment

After wandering around a few shops and taking refreshment, time to head back popping onto the station to take a few photographs.  Same walk the reverse route althoug there are a few other routes.   The only difference was crossing the swing bridge in the docks and using the path on the other side of the basin.   6 miles total up to the station and then wandering round, quite enough.The London train departing at the far northern end of Preston StationThe London train departing at the far northern end of Preston Station

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The Mayor of Preston Visits The Ribble Steam Railway 25th March 2023

On Saturday 25th March 2023 the Mayor of Preston, Councillor Neil Darby visited the Ribble Steam Railway on Preston Docks.   Furness Railway Trust Loco No 20 was operating.   A triumphant piece of work by the Trust to restore a fine looking locomotive and the oldest working standard gauge loco in Britain, 1863.

The Mayor of Preston, Neil Derby and Mayor's Consort Dan Leung, on Furness Trust loco 20. The oldest working loco in Britain. At the Ribble Steam Railway on 25th March 2023.

The Mayor of Preston, Neil Darby and the Mayor’s Consort Dan Leung, on Furness Trust loco 20. The oldest working standard gauge loco in Britain. At the Ribble Steam Railway on 25th March 2023.

Team Members relax before the next trip:

The Mayor Departs, as they say in the Red Arrows, ‘smoke on’.The Mayor of Preston, Neil Derby and colleague, depart the station on Furness Trust loco 20. The oldest working loco in Britain. At the Ribble Steam Railway on 25th March 2023.The Mayor of Preston, Neil Darby departs on board Furness Trust loco 20. The oldest working standard gauge loco in Britain. At the Ribble Steam Railway on 25th March 2023.

Young loco ‘Linda’ sidles up to double head with Furness Trust 20.

The Mayor and Consort return and generously pose for a photo.

Thirsty work hauling carriages both locos line up for water.

It’s goodbye to Furness Loco 20 as it moves to Didcot for a spell shortly.

Find out more at

Ribble Steam Railway

http://www.furnessrailwaytrust.org.uk/

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A walk in Preston Centre 21st March 2023

Another walk in the centre of Preston.

A photo of the The Old Bull on Church Street.   It was once Preston’s top inn and called the Bull & Royal.  There is a well known painting in the Harris Museum & Art Gallery titled ‘The Preston By-Election of 1862’ which shows a large crowd standing outside the inn with Sir Thomas Hesketh standing on the balcony having won the seat.  Well worth having a look when the Harris re-opens.

This part of Church Street had 2 cinemas.  The Gaumont and The Ritz.  They gradually changed, declined and rotted.

Crystal House, the site of the previous Town Hall, destroyed by fire in 1947.   On March 17th, which is almost exactly 76 years ago.

The Obelisk on Preston Flag Market.  Positioned in 1782 but removed in 1853 and placed in the grounds of a house in the village of Woodplumpton to the north of Preston.    In 1979 Queen Elizabeth II unveiled it after it was returned on May 10th, 800yrs after Preston received a Royal Charter. 

Market Street as viewed from the Flag Market.   Leading to the 2 impressive Victorian Covered Markets.   On the corner of Market Street is the former Barclays Bank which was Martin’s Bank.

The former Public Hall or Corn Exchange on Lune Street.

Lune Street.

Re-cladding of The Premier Inn, all around this nicely present house round the corner from the former Public Hall.

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Two food stops outside the Premier Inn.

 

This wooden building has been there a long time.  Preston City Mission, Corporation Street.

The entrance to the car park behind the railway station.  An interesting route beneath the shops.

Across Corporation Street.  That section hasn’t changed much for decades.

Fishergate from near the station

Preston Railway Station Butler Street entrance, looking towards the main central entrance and ticket office.

 

Preston Station main platforms, 3 and 4, for the West Coast Main Line between London and Glasgow.  Birmingham and Edinburgh too.

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A Walk in Preston Centre 10th March 2023

Another walk in Preston.  It was a lovely day and I’d bought a new camera at Wilkinson’s Cameras in St George’s Mall, Preston.   A pocket camera with a small sensor but a big optical zoom.

Here we are under a blue sky on the main shopping street, Fishergate, looking at Bistro Pierre in the old Baptist Church.

Fishergate from near the Railway Station.

The Harris front with its ornate apex.

Wide angle view of the Town Hall, Cenotaph, Harris building, Flag Market

 

The Booths bridge, 0nce the Main Shop of Booths Supermarket.  Complete with waiters/waitresses in old fashioned clothes.

Zooming in on the Town Hall.

The Old Post Office behind the Cenotaph. The planned hotel isn’t yet taking shape.

 

Zooming in on the Miller Arcade.

 

Fishergate from the East end.

Miller Arcade on a sunny day.  There used to be domes on the corners.

 

The former TSB now a Wetherspoons, The Twelve Tellers.

St John’s Minster or the Parish Church of Preston

Cardinal Newman College from St John’s.

Arkwright House Preston. Where the inventor lived.  At the back of St John’s.

 

An interesting terrace near the railway station.

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A walk in Preston Centre and Beatrice Todd on International Women’s Day 8th March 2023

Another walk around Preston.  This time it’s on International Women’s Day 8th March 2023.  It added some flavour when we reached Winckley Square as there had been a Blue Plaque mounted for Beatrice Todd, Suffragist.  On the square was a display of wall boards and balloons for the 3 women of Preston who campaigned for women’s rights in the early 20th Century.

The wall boards, Left to Right.  Beatrice Blackhirst 1866-1955, political and suffragist activist and Preston Soldiers and Sailors buffet.  It’s hard to imagine she lived in Preston when I did, dying at 89.  Edith Rigby 1872-1950, militant Suffragette Activist, living to the age of 78, I was in Preston then as well.  Beatrice Todd 1876-1958, living to 82, political and suffragist activist and Preston Soldiers and Sailors buffet.  They had long lives.  Did they die with recognition in their time?

Women of Winckley Square display mounted for one day.

Just to the left of the wall boards is a balloon display.   Purple  for  loyalty,  white  for purity,  green for hope are the colours of the suffragette movement.Women of Winckley Square display mounted for one day. Purple  for  loyalty,  white  for purity,  green for hope are the colours of the suffragette movement.

A Blue Plaque for Beatrice Todd was unveiled on the day.

The Blue Plaque for Beatrice Todd, Suffragist, near Winckley Square, Preston

The Blue Plaque for Beatrice Todd, Suffragist, near Winckley Square, Preston

A walk up Friargate, Preston’s second shopping street, with the well known angle on the Harris Building.The view of the Harris Museum and Art Galley from Friargate in Preston.

The Harris Building still under wrappers, due to re-open in 2024.The Harris Museum and Art Gallery, closed for refurbishment until 2024.

The Miller Arcade, one of the best buildings in Preston.  Shops and cafes. A Rohan shop being it’s best offer we think.

Miller Arcade next to the Harris Museum and Art Gallery in Preston.

The former National Westminster Bank, now Revolution with a reversed E.

The Revolution bar in Preston in what was the National Westminster Bank.

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Deepdale Retail Centre and Preston Football Ground walk – 11th February 2023

Deepdale Retail Centre near the football ground and within reach of three motorway junctions.  Easy to park, although it does get busy on the road outside, and we haven’t been at weekend.

M&S, Boots, Next, Game, JD, TUi, Craft Shop, Wilko, Poundland, Flannels, Sport Direct.  Plus more, a kitchen place. Also a Curry’s next door.

Deepdale Retail Centre, Preston, February 2023

Deepdale Retail Centre, Preston, February 2023

Deepdale Retail Centre, Preston, February 2023

Deepdale Retail Centre, Preston, February 2023

 

Deepdale Retail Centre, Preston, February 2023

We saw the floodlights so after the shops and a coffee in M&S we took a walk along Blackpool Road, past St Gregory’s Church to the ground.

The brilliant statue, called Splash! based on a photograph, of Sir Tom Finney, Preston North End and England’s Flying Winger of the 1950’s stands outside the ground.

Splash! Sir Tom Finney Statue at Deepdale the ground of Preston North End

Just past Splash! is a mural celebrating Preston’s famous women footballers of the 1920’s.  Based at Dick, Kerr, a Scottish Company who had a big engineering factory on Strand Road next to Preston Docks making trams, planes, trains, electric motors.

Dick Kerr ladies football team of Preston. The mural at Deepdale, the ground of Preston North End

St Gregory’s Church on Blackpool Road near the football ground.  Quite an imposing front.

St Gregory's Church on Blackpool Road, Preston. Near the football ground, Deepdale.

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Well known Preston historian dies

The death has been announced of Stephen Sartin who is well known in Preston heritage circles for his talks and books and worked at the Harris for many years.   Born in 1938

There are tributes in Blog Preston, and the Preston Historical Society wrote a tribute on their Facebook page.

Our own experience is of attending several talks at Alston Hall where Stephen gave many of his inimitable talks.  He’d turn up with enough slides to last 3 days and then in between his anecdotes would apologise that he was unlikely to show us all the slides he’d brought.  Although in reality he didn’t need any slides as people were absorbed.  What he had to say and his genial style gave him charisma.

He often said he was available at the Judge’s Lodgings in Lancaster.  It’s an interesting building operated by Lancashire County Council and worth a visit.

Below is a photo of the front and rear cover of one of his books that we own, published in 1988 ‘The people and places of Historic Preston’ by Stephen Sartin, with drawings by Martyn Hanks.

Front Cover of Historic Preston by Stephen Sartin, 1988

Front Cover of Historic Preston by Stephen Sartin, 1988

Rear Cover of Historic Preston by Stephen Sartin, 1988

Rear Cover of Historic Preston by Stephen Sartin, 1988

 

Another book is Beattie’s Preston, published by the Harris in 1979.

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Preston Centre walk 31st January 2023

A windy wintery day.  The Harris Museum parcelled for refurbishment viewed from Lancaster Road.  How bright will it look when all is revealed in 2024.

The Harris Museum, Art Gallery and Library under cover until 2024. As at 31st January 2023.

The Harris Museum, Art Gallery and Library on 31st January 2023. Under cover until 2024.

Preston Market, half outdoor, half indoor.  The old Victorian Covered Market with another just across the road.  Big and busy.

Preston's Victorian Covered Market with an indoor section at the far end.

Preston’s Victorian Covered Market with an indoor section at the far end.

Wallace and Gromit outside the Preston Market entrance.

Wallace and Gromit outside Preston Market

Wallace and Gromit outside Preston Market

Orchard Street with the Black Horse pub on the right and St George’s Shopping Centre across the road.

The view of St George's Shopping Centre entrance from Orchard Street

The view of St George’s Shopping Centre entrance from Orchard Street

The corner of Friargate and Ringway being reworked up to Fleet Street.

In Fox Street, the old St Wilfred’s School with two Blue Plaques.

Fox Street’s old buildings.

Fishergate looking east.

Fishergate looking west with the former Baptist Church, now a Bistro Pierre.

Travelling west down Fishergate Hill with Lancashire County Council’s building next to the railway line.

Strand Road with the former East Works of English Electric Traction, Dick Kerrs and more lately Alstom, now empty probably.

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A few photos of Preston 9th January 2023

A short walk in Preston with a few photos on the 9th January 2023.

A view from the train of part of the University of Central Lancashire, UCLan.   Ever growing and now a major, perhaps the major, part of the centre of Preston.

The University of Central Lancashire from the train 9th January 2023

University of Central Lancashire from the train
9th January 2023
www.madeinpreston.co.uk

 

After walking from the station along the main shopping street, Fishergate, you come to Crystal House, with its new cladding, opposite Waterstones. The almost new former cladding being replaced after Grenfell.   A decent Waterstones with 2 large floors and dark coloured shelves to differentiate it from less serious branches with pine coloured shelves.    This Waterstones was the main store of Booth’s the Grocers with it’s cafe of pinafore dressed waitresses, quite posh.  Booths is now mainly large stores out of town.

We had coffee in a place called Rise!, in Miller Arcade, which was pretty good.

Crystal House on Fishergate Preston

University of Central Lancashire from the train
9th January 2023
www.madeinpreston.co.uk

 

St Georges Anglican Church off Lune Street near the corner of Friargate.  Built in 1725 and added to several times since.  It’s said to be attractive inside and has regular services.  One day we’ll go in.

St Geroge's Church off Lune Street Preston 9t hJanuary 2023

St Geroge’s Church off Lune Street Preston 9t hJanuary 2023

The Corn Exchange on Lune Street.  It started as a Corn Exchange, then became the Public Hall which was a music centre with a balcony all round.  The Beatles played there twice.  Now it’s a pub.  Outside is the stonework commemorating troops firing on the Chartists.

The Corn Exchange, Lune Street, Preston 9th January 2023

St Geroge’s Church off Lune Street Preston 9t hJanuary 2023

The Central Methodist Church on Lune Street.

The Central Methodist Church, Lune Street Preston 9t hJanuary 2023

The Central Methodist Church, Lune Street Preston 9t hJanuary 2023

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Book Review: Types and Shadows – A history of Preston City Parish

Although published in 2015, we only recently stumbled upon this book in Preston Libary.   The library is now in the Guild Hall unfortunately while the Harris is refurbished, what a shame about the Guild Hall as well, but that’s another story.

The reading of this book was largely by dipping in.  Although the book isn’t very long, 145 pages, it seems more the sort of book you’d dip into.  It’s written in an academic manner which is good but isn’t the easiest read.

It begins with a foreword by Lord Derby who makes the stand out comment that for people in the south the term ‘once in a Preston Guild’ means nothing.  It’s one of those things that small and unintended slights niggle.   Although I have actually met Lord Derby and he went out of his way to greet people and gave a great speech very fitting to a local event.

The next section is called the Introit.   Looking it up, it’s a psalm or antiphon sung or said while the priest approaches the altar for the Eucharist.   This starts with a nicely written page describing Preston’s link with the church and continues in two more sections.

The book then covers the history of Preston in not too much depth but with depth of thought in the areas covered.  There are a lot of old maps and church art.  It’s always interested me that Preston has one of the strongest Roman Catholic presences in England. The book also covers each church in the parish.

I’ve written this without reading the whole book and if it wasn’t so highly priced I’d buy it without doubt.  But for now it will be returned to the library and if I stumble upon it somewhere it might become a purchase.

Types and Shadows - A history of Preston City Parish by Edmund J Crichton.

Types and Shadows – A history of Preston City Parish by Edmund J Crichton.

 

Click here to view our webpage including other history books about Preston

 

 

 

 

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A few photos from a walk in Preston 1st November 2022

Walking from the south east corner of the open Fishergate Centre car park you go out onto the street and turn right past a small car park and carry on to Milller Park.  The view is below:

Miller Park, Preston

Miller Park, Preston, 1st November 2022

There are some nice properties in the area:

Property near Miller Park, Preston

Property near Miller Park, Preston

Walking back into the centre through Winckley Square along Cross Street to pedestrianised Cannon Street, there are some interesting properties.  Remember the song Matthew and Son, the work’s never done.

Cannon Street, Preston

Cannon Street, Preston

Glovers Court from Waterstones taking a back route along Cross Street and Winckley Square to the car park:

Glovers, Glovers Court, Preston

 

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Harris Museum and Art Gallery Jigsaw 2022

In 2022 a new jigsaw of the Harris Museum and Art Gallery is available to buy at the Library.  Note that while the Harris building is being upgraded the Library is in the Guild Hall.

Photo of the Harris Museum, Preston, Jigsaw(half of it) and box

The jigsaw is a 360 degree photo of inside the building and it looks like it’s a photo of some time ago.   It’s not an easy jigsaw and has some quirky features such as being long and thin and one that would be a spoiler to say what it is.

Until you do it you don’t realise how little you know of some features but how much you know of others.  It’s a well designed jigsaw with pieces that look similar having a similar shape, but they aren’t the same.  It involved some swapping around when the mistakes come to light.  At first it seems like it will take years to do then things suddenly speed up.  All part of the fun of jigsaws.

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Covid 19 data in Preston March 15th 2021

Preston appeared to have less Covid 19 than similar places in northwest England but in late February the slow decline left Preston in the top ten case areas in England and on some measures, it is said, at the top.

On 10th March 2021 Preston was 7th in England and top in the north-west with 142 cases per 100,000 on a 7 day average.  Blackburn and Darwen was 12th.  South Ribble 23rd.  Data taken from Gov website by @UKCovid19Stats on twitter.

The charts below are from the Government websites:

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